Net Zero Challenge: a global pitch competition about using open data for climate action

The Net Zero Challenge is a global competition to advance climate action using open data. It is being launched by Open Knowledge Foundation with support from Microsoft and the UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office.

Our aim is to identify, promote and support innovative, practical and scalable uses of open data that:

  1. Understand climate risks
  2. Track climate progress
  3. Enable informed climate action, or
  4. Evaluate climate impact.

We want to hear from individuals, groups and organisations. You can apply with a:

  • Project you are already working on, or
  • Concept for something you want to develop in the future.

The first stage of the Net Zero Challenge is a ‘Virtual Pitch Contest’. The prize for this ‘pitch’ stage of the Net Zero Challenge is $1,000 USD - to support development of your idea.

Apply now by filling out this form. All applications must be received by 6pm Pacific Standard Time on Friday 12th March 2021. Late submissions will not be accepted.

Full details in this blogpost:

Is there a working definition for open data that applications must align with? I checked the base site and FAQ and could not see that question traversed.

The reason I ask is that there are truly hideous examples of “open data” platforms in the pipeline that are necessarily designed to operate under non‑disclosure contracts. (I have one instance that I’ll post to this forum immediately after its public launch scheduled for mid‑2021 and you will understand why I say “hideous” when you read the details.)

Dear Robbie

Many thanks for your question from last week.

We have updated the FAQs on the Net Zero Challenge website to answer your question.

That is a well written guideline in your FAQ. This treatment under European Union law might also be of interest:

Namely recital 16 (page 58):

Open data as a concept is generally understood to denote data in an open format that can be freely used, re-used and shared by anyone for any purpose.

Note however, that “re‑use” is later defined quite restrictively in main body of that same legislation.